Del Norte Review, by Ron Scheer

This dark western novella from Texas writer Julia Robb begins appropriately with the gravestone of a murdered man. The stone leans against an interior wall of a saloon, the Del Norte of the story’s title, owned and operated by a Mexican woman, Magdalena Chapas. We’re in a dusty garrison town in West Texas. The year…

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Julia Robb, Scalp Mountain –
Review and Interview by Ron Scheer

Readers, I gave this interview in 2012, and it was published on buddiesinthesaddle.com. Sadly, Ron Scheer, who reviewed and interviewed me, has since died. REVIEW This is a fine novel. If you drew a line between Lonesome Dove and All the Pretty Horses, you would find Scalp Mountain somewhere along the way. Robb immerses you…

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STORYTELLER’S 7: JULIA ROBB, WAR GAMES AND OTHER ADVENTURES

READERS, Tom Rizzo published this interview on his website, and you can find him at http://tomrizzo.com   If you ever have a chance to sit down with Julia Robb and chat about her award-winning days as a journalist, you’ll leave laughing, shaking your head, or gawking in astonishment. A storyteller in every sense of the word,…

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An interview with Julia Robb by Colin Falconer

I’m absolutely delighted to have Julia Robb as my guest on the blog today. Julia and I have never met and we don’t even always see eye to eye on things, but I love her take on life and I am a huge fan of her work. Scalp Mountain was one of the best books…

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Interview with Julia Robb – – by Simon Andrew Stirling

Back in November I reviewed Julia Robb’s excellent novel, SAINT OF THE BURNING HEART – a gritty portrayal of passions and tensions in a small Texan town near the Mexican border.  The spare, crisp, no-nonsense descriptions, authentic-sounding dialogue and expertly conjured atmosphere of the novel made it a truly gripping and impressive read. So I…

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Saint of the Burning Heart ~ ~ ~ ~ Review by Simon Stirling

Unless you’ve been waiting with breathless anticipation to read a book by an author with whose work you’re familiar, and which you therefore have high hopes of enjoying, the unspoken thought in any reviewer’s mind when starting to read a new book must inevitably be: “Oh please, please, please let it be good!” Well, with Julia…

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SCALP MOUNTAIN REVIEWED BY KIRKUS

Review posted on June 29th, 2012 … Family dramas propel this spare, anti-romantic western. The title may be slightly misleading: While this Western takes place in the mountainous West Texas region, the emphasis is mostly on the “scalp” part. As a Texas Ranger explains to a friend’s Baltimore-born wife, when it comes to scalping, “Sister,…

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Steve Mathisen’s assessment of Scalp Mountain

Scalp Mountain introduces you to an era of no easy answers. The characters are realistically complex and the situations ring true. Julia Robb has written a novel that reflects the true strength and weakness of Texans and Comanches at a point in time where the both were struggling to survive each other. She draws you…

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Scalp Mountain Review by James Paddock (Sahuarita, AZ USA)

…Not being a big fan of the western genre, I was unsure about Scalp Mountain. Once into it I found myself reading later than usual, even picking it up during the day, which I very seldom do. The story kept drawing me back in, engaging me in the lives of the characters, forming a picture…

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Scalp Mountain Review by By Glen Rose

My first thought; I will be nice and buy this western book by a woman and I would go easy with the criticism. I could NOT stop reading. I think the characters were drawn to more resemble the true personalities of people during that time. All bad men (and woman) are not ALL bad. The…

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