Scalp Mountain, first chapter

Colum McNeal was almost out of luck. He was running from his father’s hired killers, from an old acquaintance who hated him but wouldn’t say why, and from an Apache with a grudge.

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Here’s a new thing friends

Hi, from now on, I’m posting most days, except Saturday, and most days my Facebook post and this blog will be identical. Not all. Read ’em and weep. Hey friends: I wrote this morning and part of the afternoon on my new novel and then decided to take a bath. The water was so nice and warm…

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Texas Guitar Man

I was in West Texas, driving through long stretches of nothing, then little towns where stores on the dusty main street were empty and closed: Windows still advertised sales ending five years ago. The only living buildings were churches, and  convenience stores on the highway. Then I saw a man sitting on a bench, playing a…

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The Captured: Children Kidnapped by Comanches

Former Comanche captives, taken as children, did not do well after their release: They couldn’t stay married, they couldn’t keep a job, some of them never learned to read and write, they couldn’t stay in one place, they had a hard time communicating and generally seemed like unhappy people.

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Tom Rizzo and His Stories: You Can’t Stop With One

  Hello readers: I began to read The Lawbreakers, by Tom Rizzo, a few days ago and couldn’t stop, so I finished and bought The Law Keepers. Real-life stories about the West’s lawmen and their opponents are like popcorn, once you start you don’t want to stop. So, of course, my next move was to interview author Tom…

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Custer’s Last Stand and The Strategy of Defeat

The “strategy” of George Armstrong Custer’s defeat at the Little Big Horn lies in the interpretation of the orders he received from his boss, Brigadier General Alfred Howe Terry.

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Greg Michno, Sand Creek and The End of History

Michno believes his books have not changed the perception of Sand Creek, “or that anything will. What I hope is that those who read the book will possibly come away with some understanding as to why they will not change their minds, no matter what the facts are.”

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The Captive Boy, Comanches and Me

I was sitting by Col. Theodore (Mac) McKenna’s desk when Privates Wilson and Smith dragged the kid through the door.

They wrestled him to a chair and held him down, trying to tie him up while he fought them, their hands wthpstl slipping on his greased up skin.

The kid wasn’t wearing clothes to speak of, just a breechclout barely covering his privates and deerskin leggings over his tattered moccasins.

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Comanches and The Captive Boy

The story of August Shiltz, The Captive Boy, was inspired by the real-life captives held by the Comanches, and what happened to many of them when they were released.

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Rebel Yell and Comanche Moon: Sam Gwynne Speaks.

 Hi S.C. Gwynne (better known as Sam Gwynne): Thanks so much for talking to me. I’ve admired you for years, since I read Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History.  Not only do I admire the job you did…

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