Billy The Kid–To Hell on a Fast Horse

Author Mark Gardner tells us everything we wanted to know about Billy the Kid; that Billy had a (previously undiscovered) brother he visited, and Billy was armed when he was killed. Experts have led us to believe the kid was not armed.

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Comanches and The Captive Boy

The story of August Shiltz, The Captive Boy, was inspired by the real-life captives held by the Comanches, and what happened to many of them when they were released.

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Bob Boze Bell and His True West

True West magazine continues to evolve and is in the process of expanding its reach digitally, online. The Facebook page is breaking new ground every day with images snagging hundreds of thousands of views.

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Jeff Guinn Talks Wyatt Earp and The Last Gunfight

Who were the bad guys at the OK Corral, Wyatt Earp, his brothers and Doc Holliday, or the “cowboys” who were killed? Author Jeff Guinn tells us.

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Thom Ross Reimagines Custer, Wyatt Earp and the Old West

He is interpreting Western legend, explaining its higher meanings and defending it.

Thom Ross is the only artist who has ever created 200 full-sized figures depicting the Seventh Cavalry and the Sioux and Cheyenne fighting at the Little Big Horn–and in 2005 the figures were actually erected on the battlefield.

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Rebel Yell and Comanche Moon: Sam Gwynne Speaks.

 Hi S.C. Gwynne (better known as Sam Gwynne): Thanks so much for talking to me. I’ve admired you for years, since I read Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History.  Not only do I admire the job you did…

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Dan O’Brien, Buffalo Ranching and Books

Buffalo rancher and author Dan O’Brien says he has spent the last fifteen years of his life “trying to give buffalo a dignified death that beats the alternative.
“They seem to understand that, much better than some people.”

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Texas’ Southern Great Plains: The Last Picture Show

This is the irony of Texas. We destroyed the plains to build the towns that are now disappearing as well. Thanks to dwindling water supplies, and farm and ranch mechanization, many of the small towns flung between Abilene, Amarillo, and El Paso are vanishing like dust on the wind.

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Who Were Those Masked Men?

This article was originally published in The Texas Observer magazine Here’s my most vivid memory from Midland: I am a teenager, my nose pressed flat to the glass to better see a display case at the Midland County Historical Museum. The case and the museum are in the county library’s dark basement. Yet the object of…

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Alamo heroes–Writer Talks about Travis, Crockett and Bowie

William B. Travis, David Crockett and Jim Bowie, who died at The Alamo, were heroes who can’t be judged by modern standards, says historian William Davis.

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